London Fire Brigade

Women underrepresented in Brigade consultation responses as deadline looms

24 January 2017

London's first woman fire commissioner is urging women to have their say in our consultation as midway results show they account for less than a third of the people taking part.

A snapshot of the people who have participated in the draft London Safety Plan shows that only 30 per cent of the respondents have been women.

London Fire Commissioner Dany Cotton took up her post on 1 January, becoming the first woman appointed to the role in our 151 year history. 


Have your say

  • The consultation is now closed.

Establishing a more challenging attendance time target, increasing terrorism response capabilities and placing fire stations at the heart of the community are just some of the proposals put forward in the Plan which closes at noon on Monday, 30 January 2017.

There are no proposals to reduce the number of firefighters, fire stations or fire engines.

London Fire Commissioner Dany Cotton said: "Fire doesn't discriminate and our four year plan affects everyone no matter what gender, religion or ethnicity.



"We're 50 per cent of the population and women's views are vital so we can learn what they want from their fire and rescue service and how we can make London the safest global city.

"In my first few weeks in the job I've been out talking to a number of people and I know how important the Brigade is to Londoners so don't miss out on the chance to scope our service in the future."

Only three in Barking and Dagenham

The early analysis also highlights Barking and Dagenham has the lowest number of filled out consultation questionnaires by borough,with only three residents taking part.

More concerning is that only 12 people in Kingston have taken part,even though the Plan proposes a move of one of Kingston' two fire engines to New Malden.
 
The Commissioner wants to improve diversity and community relations within the Brigade.

The Plan outlines how we want to throw open the 'big red doors' of fire stations, allowing the community to engage more with firefighters and freeing up facilities for community use.

As well as placing stations at the heart of the community, there is also a desire to make sure our staff experience an inclusive culture in the workplace.
 
The draft Plan echoes the recommendations of Lord Harris, setting out intentions to boost the number of specialist firefighters trained to move in behind the police to fight fires and help treat casualties in a terrorist incident.