London Fire Brigade

Meet two of the stars of the ITV Inside London Fire Brigade documentary

02 August 2017

Meet two stars of episode two of ITV’s Inside London Fire Brigade answer questions ahead of tomorrow night’s show.

Edric Kennedy MacFoy - Crew Manager


Q: What are the most enjoyable parts of being a firefighter?
A: I love showing up for work and not knowing how my day will begin or end. What will I be faced with today? Who will I help? What will I learn? How will I grow? Knowing I will be called upon in times of need gives me great pleasure and a sense of purpose.


Q: What do you think our ITV audience will learn from watching the series?
A: That there is so much more to the role of firefighter than one would presume and that we really will put our lives at risk to save theirs.


Q: Most of us will be familiar with the cliché involving a fire crew saving a cat from a tree. But what's the strangest/funniest call-out you've ever attended?
A:. There was a middle-aged lady whose premises we attended on a few occasions to perform a rescue. She just kept on getting her big toe stuck in the bath tap. I realised then that there’s so much more to the job than extinguishing fires! We will always be there to help you but do say to people if doesn’t fit - don’t force it!



  

Steve Dudeney - Borough Commander Hackney

 

Q: How long have you been a Firefighter and what made you want to pursue a career in this profession?
A: I have been a firefighter for 30 years, I joined in July 1987 aged 18. I lived near Poplar Fire Station in East London when I was growing up during the 70’s and 80’s when there were lots of fires. I used to see the fire engines rushing out to calls all the time, I have wanted to be a Firefighter for as long as I can remember.


Q: What would you say are the most challenging parts of the role?
A: As a Borough Commander, our teams are a lot smaller than they were years ago. I can be sitting down talking to a new firefighter about their development, followed by emailing the head of fire and security at a large office complex talking through evacuation plans and then running off to a meeting with social services to discuss safeguarding. I thrive on it, but it isn’t a walk in the park as the role is just so broad.


Q: What do you think is the most common mistake people make in their homes around fire safety?
A: People think ‘it won’t happen to me’. Crime happens to everyone but fires only happen to other people. They will spend hundreds on burglar alarms, rightly so, but up until recently trying to convince someone to spend a tenner on a couple of smoke alarms was really difficult.